Adding Insult to Injury

A software crash is probably the worst thing that can ever happen to a user, and is sometimes a good reason for some to get pissed enough to let the world know. Today one such user posted a topic titled “SW CRASHED for no reason !!!!” on the SolidWorks Discussion Forums. He vented out his anger in the following manner:
“For no reason, SW just CRASHED ! This is totally ridiculous !!! In Inventor, I can guess when it crashed. Before I made any complicated change to a model, I thought IV might crash then I saved the model before making a change In SW, sometimes I made some simple change to a model and SW CRASHED. I just lost couple hrs of working this morning. This is rideculous and unacceptable”

To which a wise man replied, “I’m sure it had a reason…it just chose not to share it with you.”

Talk about adding insult to injury.

  • Evan Yares

    Crashes that happen in a seemingly random fashion — with no apparent reason — are often the result of memory allocation problems. You never see the problem until the program tries to read something from an area of memory that no longer contains that thing.

    Not much you can do about it. But I can say this: when the people at SolidWorks hear about this kind of thing happening, they get a queasy feeling.

    They *hate* it when SolidWorks does something that costs users hours out of their lives. Why? Because they know how to multiply. Take the two hours lost here, and multiply it by the number of SolidWorks users… and you’re talking about the equivalent of a human lifetime. And, yes, I first heard this concept from John McEleney, the former CEO of SolidWorks.

    I know that they *are* working to fix it so this sort of thing doesn’t happen. But it is not an easy thing to do. Most every CAD system out there has memory related crash problems.

  • Evan Yares

    Crashes that happen in a seemingly random fashion — with no apparent reason — are often the result of memory allocation problems. You never see the problem until the program tries to read something from an area of memory that no longer contains that thing.Not much you can do about it. But I can say this: when the people at SolidWorks hear about this kind of thing happening, they get a queasy feeling. They *hate* it when SolidWorks does something that costs users hours out of their lives. Why? Because they know how to multiply. Take the two hours lost here, and multiply it by the number of SolidWorks users… and you’re talking about the equivalent of a human lifetime. And, yes, I first heard this concept from John McEleney, the former CEO of SolidWorks.I know that they *are* working to fix it so this sort of thing doesn’t happen. But it is not an easy thing to do. Most every CAD system out there has memory related crash problems.