Delcam PowerSHAPE 2010

This post is a summary of the seven part Delcam PowerSHAPE 2010 series. Given below are links to each part along with a brief description.

Part 1: The difference between solid and surface modeling and where they are preferred.

Part 2: The reasons why Delcam chose to add the Parasolid modeling kernel to PowerSHAPE 2010.

Part 3: Why I believe an easy and simple user interface is critically important when convincing prospects to try out a CAD system.

Part 4: Creating a very simple Lego block using solid modeling.

Part 5: Editing the features of the Lego block and understanding how PowerSHAPE organizes and builds features.

Part 6: Modifying the Lego block using surface modeling.

Part 7: “Personalizing” the Lego block using mesh modeling.

Disclosure: Nobody from Delcam asked me to write this series. I do not even have a license of PowerSHAPE 2010. Throughout this series I used the free version called PowerSHAPE-e 2010 (you can download your copy here). Well, PowerSHAPE-e is not exactly free. You can model all you want but need to purchase a “voucher” from Delcam if you want to export your work to a file format other than “.emodel”, PowerSHAPE-e’s native file format.

The voucher system is a per-per-use system for Exchange, Delcam’s data exchange solution. You can get more information on the voucher system here. Basically, you buy a voucher costing £34 (about $56) for each .emodel file which can be of any size and can be exported any number of times. Half way through this series, Al Dean from DEVELOP3D connected me to Peter Dickin, Marketing Manager of Delcam. Peter offered me a no-cost Exchange account. But I ended up not using it as nothing I did with PowerShape-e needed me to export a model.

So I guess I don’t have much to disclose after all.

  • Tony

    It looks like using Exchange via PowerSHAPE-e has different pricing than just using Exchange. IIRC, the pricing for Exchange is £34 per file.

    For PowerSHAPE-e, IIRC it used to be £200 per model to export. However, when I tried to verify this price, it looks like it’s now a much more reasonable £50 (exact wording: “Saving files is completely free, exporting them for manufacture is charged at £50 ($99) per model.” here http://www.powershape-e.com/general/cad_data.asp).

    Importing to PowerSHAPE-e via Exchange has always been free.

  • Tony

    It looks like using Exchange via PowerSHAPE-e has different pricing than just using Exchange. IIRC, the pricing for Exchange is £34 per file.

    For PowerSHAPE-e, IIRC it used to be £200 per model to export. However, when I tried to verify this price, it looks like it’s now a much more reasonable £50 (exact wording: “Saving files is completely free, exporting them for manufacture is charged at £50 ($99) per model.” here http://www.powershape-e.com/general/cad_data.asp).

    Importing to PowerSHAPE-e via Exchange has always been free.

  • Really? £200 ($329) for one file? That’s crazy. 25 files and you might as well buy a full license.

  • Really? £200 ($329) for one file? That’s crazy. 25 files and you might as well buy a full license.

  • Kevin Quigley

    Powershape is a great app Deelip. Many toolmakers swear by it rather than at it. I just wish it was a bit more affordable for the average design business. If you liked this one you should try VX as well (www.vx.com). Another one of the “great underestimated apps” out there. Difference is VX is affordable, has its own very powerful kernel and can do a lot of what Powershape can with meshes and so on. Try it. I’m sure Bob or Mike at VX can help you out via a webinar. I use VX in conjunction with SolidWorks.

  • Kevin Quigley

    Powershape is a great app Deelip. Many toolmakers swear by it rather than at it. I just wish it was a bit more affordable for the average design business. If you liked this one you should try VX as well (www.vx.com). Another one of the “great underestimated apps” out there. Difference is VX is affordable, has its own very powerful kernel and can do a lot of what Powershape can with meshes and so on. Try it. I’m sure Bob or Mike at VX can help you out via a webinar. I use VX in conjunction with SolidWorks.

  • Kevin,

    Yes, VX is on my list of CAD systems that I want to familiarize myself with. The thing is I do this in my free time (something I lack in abundance), or when I don’t want to write another C++ statement for a while. Which happened to be the case this time, after we released our MCAD range of AutoCAD plug-ins.

    We are getting ready to release another bunch of add-ins for SolidWorks. I find that blogging serves as a good breather between hectic rounds of software development. Helps clear the mind.

  • Kevin,

    Yes, VX is on my list of CAD systems that I want to familiarize myself with. The thing is I do this in my free time (something I lack in abundance), or when I don’t want to write another C++ statement for a while. Which happened to be the case this time, after we released our MCAD range of AutoCAD plug-ins.

    We are getting ready to release another bunch of add-ins for SolidWorks. I find that blogging serves as a good breather between hectic rounds of software development. Helps clear the mind.

  • Tony

    Deelip,

    My impression (and hope) is that the PowerSHAPE-e pricing is per model, not file; in other words, if you have a design that is an assembly, then the translation price includes all the parts in that assembly (and all their sub-parts).

    Some CAD systems store everything in one file, too, instead of having an assembly files and separate part files. (CoCreate seems to do this, from my limited use of CoCreate PE).

    I know about the time problem; I picked up a copy of VX Innovator when it was on sale, and liked it at first glance, but haven’t had time to get back to it. I will (since I will have some uses for it), but it may be a while. And, I wouldn’t mind taking another look at PowerSHAPE-e, except it’s so far down my list that it’ll be years before I have time. Also, Delcam’s pricing doesn’t work for me: I need to do a substantial number of fairly simple models, so PS-e quickly becomes more expensive than my investment in VX and Alibre (<$300 total; I think I like VX better, but Alibre has some useful features).

  • Tony

    Deelip,

    My impression (and hope) is that the PowerSHAPE-e pricing is per model, not file; in other words, if you have a design that is an assembly, then the translation price includes all the parts in that assembly (and all their sub-parts).

    Some CAD systems store everything in one file, too, instead of having an assembly files and separate part files. (CoCreate seems to do this, from my limited use of CoCreate PE).

    I know about the time problem; I picked up a copy of VX Innovator when it was on sale, and liked it at first glance, but haven’t had time to get back to it. I will (since I will have some uses for it), but it may be a while. And, I wouldn’t mind taking another look at PowerSHAPE-e, except it’s so far down my list that it’ll be years before I have time. Also, Delcam’s pricing doesn’t work for me: I need to do a substantial number of fairly simple models, so PS-e quickly becomes more expensive than my investment in VX and Alibre (<$300 total; I think I like VX better, but Alibre has some useful features).

  • Pingback: What’s New In PowerSHAPE 2013 | Deelip.com()