What’s Inside? AutoCAD 2010

Ralph Grabowski had been burning the midnight oil to figure out what’s new and what’s changed in AutoCAD 2010. He has just completed writing 26,000 words, 200+ illustrations, 130 pages, and 5 chapters making up the latest edition of his “What’s Inside? AutoCAD 2010” ebook.

According to Ralph, “This ebook delves into every detail of using the new release of Autodesk’s flagship software, including new and changed commands and system variables, undocumented commands, and system requirements.” But wait. Shouldn’t the AutoCAD 2010 documentation already contain most of this?

The ebook is priced at $19.50. But if you are an existing customer, you get a 30% discount.

Link

  • Anonymous

    Autocad 2010 – Geometric Constraints seems to be like SDRC I-deas 8, so it took about 10 years for Autodesk to catch up. I would like to hear about 3D modeling and how it compares with Siemen’s synchronous technology.

    However, I think Autocad 2010 has nice improvements. 🙂

  • Anonymous

    Autocad 2010 – Geometric Constraints seems to be like SDRC I-deas 8, so it took about 10 years for Autodesk to catch up. I would like to hear about 3D modeling and how it compares with Siemen’s synchronous technology. However, I think Autocad 2010 has nice improvements. 🙂

  • R. Paul Waddington

    Anonymous, the interesting thing about geometric constraints in AutoCAD is that they were available, for use in AutoCAD,as far as back as the late 1980’s within several third party applications.

    Much more recent were the Mechslide and Genius packages that ran with AutoCAD; both had geometric constraints. Not easy to use and not widely applied; mostly due to the fact dealers failed to grasp their importance and how to apply them – so many users never got to try them out and or benefit, much the same problem Autodesk had with MDT – dunce dealers.

    Mechslide was bought up by Genius who then sold itself to Autodesk becoming AutoCAD Mechanical and constraints vanished. For those who had applied these capabilities Autodesk just shrugged their shoulders and wiped them.

    I can distinctly remember sitting in the foyer of Autodesk’s offices and being told by the “Mechanical Software Manager” parametric capabilities in AutoCAD would never happen as they were a waste of time and of no value!

    Time changes perspectives and the addition of constraints now just goes to demonstrate how out of touch Autodesk have been for a very long time.

  • R. Paul Waddington

    Anonymous, the interesting thing about geometric constraints in AutoCAD is that they were available, for use in AutoCAD,as far as back as the late 1980’s within several third party applications.Much more recent were the Mechslide and Genius packages that ran with AutoCAD; both had geometric constraints. Not easy to use and not widely applied; mostly due to the fact dealers failed to grasp their importance and how to apply them – so many users never got to try them out and or benefit, much the same problem Autodesk had with MDT – dunce dealers.Mechslide was bought up by Genius who then sold itself to Autodesk becoming AutoCAD Mechanical and constraints vanished. For those who had applied these capabilities Autodesk just shrugged their shoulders and wiped them.I can distinctly remember sitting in the foyer of Autodesk’s offices and being told by the “Mechanical Software Manager” parametric capabilities in AutoCAD would never happen as they were a waste of time and of no value!Time changes perspectives and the addition of constraints now just goes to demonstrate how out of touch Autodesk have been for a very long time.

  • Anonymous

    Nowadays, it all depends on how you market it and how much hype you can create around it even if it is 10 or 20 years old.

  • Anonymous

    Nowadays, it all depends on how you market it and how much hype you can create around it even if it is 10 or 20 years old.